Tuggeranong Schoolhouse

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A visit to Tuggeranong Schoolhouse is certainly worthwhile. Check the opening times. Stories from yesteryear come alive in the the schoolroom and the schoolmaster's house. Children's toys (below) are just part of a varied collection on show. the unique bicycle wheeled aerial was built by the teacher's son, James McGee, who went on to study at Cambridge University.

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How to get there?

From the Athllon Homestead site turn right into Caselton Drive and right into Bugden Avenue. Turn right into Kellert Street through the roundabout. At the end of Goldstein Crescent turn left into Heagney Crescent and turn 6th left into Enid Lorrimer Circuit.

From the Visitors Centre continue south over Commonwealth Bridge. Take Capital Circle around Parliament House, turn left into Canberra Avenue for 4 km. Turn left onto the Monaro Highway. Turn right into Isabella Drive, left into Coyne and first left into Heagney Drive. Take the 3rd right into Enid Lorimer Circuit.

Why is this interesting?

The Tuggeranong Schoolhouse provided 60 years of continuous schooling to pioneer families of the Tuggeranong district. Former museum education officer, teacher and storyteller, Elizabeth Burness, has furnished the home with her own collection of items, artefacts, costumes and furniture dating from the 1880s to the 1940s.

The schoolhouse was built with help from parents in 1880 with bricks manufactured on site. It included a residence for the teacher. The high-ceilinged schoolroom was cold in winter with just a small fireplace. Children walked or rode their bicycles or horses to school.

Schoolmaster Francis McGee, who presided at the school from 1898 until 1927, kept a punishment book, which can still be viewed today. Find out the reason for getting 'six of the best'. The school closed in 1939.